StoryAmp Writing Service

It can be tough to write about yourself at all, or to identify what story angles will be most compelling for the press and industry decisionmakers. StoryAmp maintains a pool of professional music journalists interested in writing your biography and press releases. By working with StoryAmp Writing Services, you know you will have professionals with vast music writing experience who know exactly what editors are looking for. Each written piece includes a 60 minute interview of you, the artist; two rounds of edits based on your feedback; your approval of the final document; and your ownership of the final product to use as you see fit. Learn More

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Biography

$300(700-800 words)

Having a fresh, compelling biography is the foundation of all your marketing and publicity. Once you get someone interested, they will want to know more. Your bio tells your full story from the vantage point of today. Show your artistic path and direction, tell about past successes, and emerging developments.

Press Release or "The Pitch"

$300(700-800 words)

Each time you go to the press or even a venue to make your case you need a compelling angle specific to your request. If you have a new release or an upcoming tour, you must express why your targets should pay attention. We call it a Pitch, because it's not about following a format. It's about telling a great story.

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  • Biography
    $300
  • Press Release or "The Pitch"
    $300
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Upon placing your order, one of our account managers will email you within 24 hours to get additional information, schedule the interview, and see what other questions you may have. The writing process typically takes one to three weeks. Payment is due upon placing your order.

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More About
the StoryAmp Writing Service

Though we built StoryAmp to help get your music and concerts to the press, we believe that half the battle is having a great story. Why not tap into the expertise of the thousands of journalists on StoryAmp to help you create yours? We have identified a pool of writers who are at the ready to interview you and help you write a biography, press release, or both. See examples below.

WHY YOU NEED A

PRESS RELEASE

A press release (or as we call it, a pitch) is centered around an upcoming 'event', such as a special performance, a large tour, an album or video release, or news about your new crowd-funding campaign. Press releases are distributed to the press and are your chance to express why they should pay attention to you. The goal of these is to be interesting, relevant, and newsworthy. Without one, no one will pay attention.

WHY YOU NEED A

BIOGRAPHY

After the music, a good band bio is the backbone of any band’s promotion efforts. Whether you're trying to book more shows, trying to get press for an album, or simply providing info to website visitors, a bio is essential to providing the necessary info to anyone interested in your band. Who is in the band? Where are they from? Why do they always have a Roland TR-808 in their songs? The bio is where these questions are answered.

HOW TO

GET STARTED

After submitting your payment, you will be contacted immediately asking for additional details. These details will be reviewed by our team and then a writer will be chosen based on your needs.

Once a writer is selected, you will be directly connected with the writer, who will then schedule a time to conduct the interview via phone or skype. The writer will ask questions ranging from your background, your current projects, and anything else relevant to your press release or biography.

The writer will submit their draft to a StoyAmp editor for review, then will be sent to you within 7-14 business days after the interview. At this point, you may make any and all edits you may see fit. This is your chance to change whatever you want, so make it count! Upon sending us your edits, the writer will make corrections, ask more questions if needed, and complete the final version of the document which you will receive and can start using to boost your career.

WHO ARE

THE WRITERS

With twenty years of experience, we have compiled an all star group of music specific journalists to write your document. Writers who have covered a wide variety of bands in outlets including Billboard, NPR, The Wall Street Journal, Google Music, VICE, Thrasher, and many more. These writers were handpicked and your writer will be chosen to best fit your needs.

Writing Examples:

The Brass Heard Round the World: Boban i Marko Marković Orkestar Bring their Dancefloor-Packing Best on Golden Horns

Boban Marković and his son, prized protégé Marko, have managed the nigh-impossible: Leaping from a deeply rooted Roma (Gypsy) scene in Serbia, they have ignited hip club dancefloors, innovating effortlessly and integrating everything from jazz to disco in brilliant, organic ways. They sound authentic, yet utterly fresh.

Mokoomba Bio

Mokoomba hails from Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe, where the band’s six members — Mathias Muzaza (lead vocalist), Ndaba Coster Moyo (Drummer, backing vocals), Trustworth Samende (Lead Guitar, backing vocals) Donald Moyo, (keyboards, backing vocals), Miti Mugande, (percussion & backing vocals) and Abundance Mutori (bass, backing vocals) — grew up as friends in the Chinotimba township.

Climbing the Mountain, The Cult Breathes New Life

At 18, 519 feet, The Cult’s Ian Astbury sat peacefully, watching the sunset on Mt. Everest from the peak of Mt. Kala Patthar. It was in this moment his deepest dreams were realized and The Cult was revived, as he frantically emailed longtime bandmate Billy Duffy to tear down the walls of their fragmented relationship. It was 2005 and The Cult had seen its first new sign of life.

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read the full biography
read the full biography
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The Brass Heard Round the World: Boban i Marko Marković Orkestar Bring their Dancefloor-Packing Best on Golden Horns

Boban Marković and his son, prized protégé Marko, have managed the nigh-impossible: Leaping from a deeply rooted Roma (Gypsy) scene in Serbia, they have ignited hip club dancefloors, innovating effortlessly and integrating everything from jazz to disco in brilliant, organic ways. They sound authentic, yet utterly fresh.

Combining the absolute flexibility of Miles Davis and the cool funk of Herb Alpert, the Boban i Marko Marković Orkestar has found the funkiest expression of their Southern Serbian Roma roots. Golden Horns (Piranha Musik; June 12, 2012) offers the perfect summary of the Markovićs’ stunning career, with tracks that reflect their dancefloor-friendly best.

“As a DJ, I’ve had nearly twenty years to see the reaction Boban i Marko Marković Orkestar get from the crowd,” explains album compiler and Balkan beatologist DJ Robert Soko (BalkanBeats). “Tracks like ‘Khelipe e cheasa,’ ‘Od Srca,’ and ‘Mundo Chochek’ simply kick ass. They get people dancing like crazy.”

Now fans and new listeners can join the party with thirteen classic cuts, from the hard-hitting, almost Latin-inflected “Sljivovica” to an aching live version of “Ederlezi,” a deeply moving song beloved from Balkan bars to the silver screen (thanks to Emir Kustarica, who featured Boban in his groundbreaking film, Underground).

The greatest-hits collection features two swinging remixes by Soko (“Go Marko Go”) and by {dunkelbunt}, adding another layer to the already rich sonic heritage of the Markovićs.

Marković the elder, from the small town of Vladičin Han, burst onto the European music scene and became the spark that lit thousands of fires. After stunning performances on stage and on film, he became the inspiration for a vibrant scene that stretched around the world: DJs, musicians, and fans who became delightfully addicted to the intricate yet grooving sounds of Balkan brass.

Far from resting on his laurels, Boban has built on his decades of experience by harnessing Marko’s youthful vibe—an energy sustained by marathon practice sessions and a lifetime spent with dad on stage. As a kid, Marko put in ten hours a day at home with his horn, a practice that drove Boban so crazy he finally insisted his son stand and deliver with the Orkestar. The determined, then fourteen-year-old Marko played so perfectly, he soon became a fixture in the group.

But Marko has done more than merely play along. Together, Boban and Marko Marković are expanding the idioms of gypsy brass: Marko can rap with spot-on precision, and the Orkestar can hint at disco, salsa, or the wilder edges of jazz. All while keeping true to tradition: the lightning-fast melodies, driving rhythms, and exuberant transcendence of the greatest Balkan brass bands.

From the pulsing, lithe “Sina Nari” to the band’s wonderfully celebratory rendition of “Hava Nagila,” Golden Horns shows why Boban, Marko, and company have managed to make Balkan brass a whole new, hip genre from Vienna to Brooklyn, while still remaining true to the centuries-old sounds of generations of Romani musicians.

“They are an authentic Serbian brass band who reinterpret traditional pieces and play their own compositions in a listenable, danceable manner. They are just so good at conveying the beauty of Southeast European music, and making it palatable for Western audiences,” Soko reflects. “At the same time, they are constantly experimenting with other musical genres—jazz, soul, classical, or even disco—melting various elements together and producing a new sound of their own.”

Mokoomba Bio

Mokoomba hails from Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe, where the band’s six members — Mathias Muzaza (lead vocalist), Ndaba Coster Moyo (Drummer, backing vocals), Trustworth Samende (Lead Guitar, backing vocals) Donald Moyo, (keyboards, backing vocals), Miti Mugande, (percussion & backing vocals) and Abundance Mutori (bass, backing vocals) — grew up as friends in the Chinotimba township.

While the majority of Zimbabweans belong to the dominant Shona ethnic group or the large Ndebele minority, the members of Mokoomba hail from a range of different ethnic groups represented in this border town, including the Luvale, Nyanja, and Tonga peoples; and it was the Tonga who gave mighty Victoria Falls, the world’s largest waterfall, its original name: “Mosioa-Tunya” (the smoke that thunders).

Living in a border town that attracts tourists from all over the world gave Mokoomba’s music an international outlook from the beginning, embracing everything from soukous to ska, hip-hop to salsa. At the same time, local music and traditions keep Mokoomba’s music rooted, giving it a unique perspective that’s unlike anything else you’ve heard from Zimbabwe before.

The members of Mokoomba began playing music as teenagers, with the help of a local bandleader, the late Alfred Mijimba, who gave the young musicians the experience they needed by hiring them to play local gigs with his band. Though he was never an international star, Mijimba was a respected local musician, and the members of Mokoomba gained considerable experience under his guidance.

The group’s members began playing together in 2001, and Mokoomba was officially born in 2008. Their first major success came that same year, when they won the Music Crossroads Inter-Regional Festival Competition in Malawi. In 2009 Mokoomba recorded their first album, Kweseka — Drifting Ahead, produced by Dutch DJ Gregor Salto, as part of the Stand UP antipoverty campaign funded by AfricaUnsigned. The album yielded up a local hit “Messe Messe”, and the group’s first European tour. Mokoomba would go on to record a second EP, Umvundla, with Salto in 2011. But their big break came in 2012, when they released Rising Tide, produced by pioneering Cote D’Ivoirian bassist Manou Gallo (Zap Mama, Kiyi M’Bock) for the Belgian label ZigZag World. The runaway success of Rising Tide would propel Mokoomba to tour over 40 countries worldwide in 2012, 2013 and 2014 from Zimbabwe to South Korea, from Norway to New Zealand, Canada to Australia, and almost everywhere in between, including performances at Denmark’s Roskilde festival, the UK’s WOMAD festival, Belgium’s Couleur Café festival, Morocco’s Gnawa festival, and an appearance on the BBC Two television program “Later… with Jools Holland”.

Hailed by critics, Rising Tide received rave reviews in such outlets as The Guardian, NPR, Songlines Magazine, fRoots Magazine, and Afropop Worldwide, The album also made many “Best of 2012” critic’s lists, and scored the band a string of awards at home and abroad, including the Songlines Music Awards – Best Newcomer 2013, NAMA Arts Personality of the Year 2013, ZIMAA Top Touring Artist of the Year 2013, the Zim Achievers – International Best Touring Artist 2014 and the ZIMA award 2014.

Since then, Mokoomba has continued to tour widely in Asia, Europe, the Pacific and especially in Africa, where they’ve solidified their standing at home as one of Zimbabwe’s most popular bands, playing with such icons as Hugh Masekela and Baba Maal at Zimbabwe’s annual Harare International Festival of the Arts. Mokoomba’s popularity in Harare and the rest of Zimbabwe cuts across cultural and ethnic lines and demonstrates the joyful, transcendent power of their sound and vision.

Mokoomba are also the subjects of a documentary called Mokoomba: From One River Bank to Another, by Frank Dalmat and Francis Ducat. The film tells the group’s story in the context of the relationship between culture and economic development in the global south!

Climbing the Mountain, The Cult Breathes New Life

At 18, 519 feet, The Cult’s Ian Astbury sat peacefully, watching the sunset on Mt. Everest from the peak of Mt. Kala Patthar. It was in this moment his deepest dreams were realized and The Cult was revived, as he frantically emailed longtime bandmate Billy Duffy to tear down the walls of their fragmented relationship. It was 2005 and The Cult had seen its first new sign of life.

After the insurmountable success of 1985’s “She Sells Sanctuary” and the Love album, The Cult released several more records, but eventually retreated into the shadows as Astbury continued to explore his own spiritual curiosities. In 1991, director Oliver Stone offered Astbury the role of Jim Morrison for The Doors film. Although he declined, it was a premonition of a four year journey that would be known as “The Lost Weekend.”

The Doors have played a role in Astbury’s life since 1979 when, as a teenager, he first heard the song “The End” during a screening of Apocalypse Now. Little did he know, his life would come full circle when he was given the rare opportunity to step into Morrison’s shoes as vocalist for The Doors 21st Century (D21C) incarnation. Over the course of 12 years and countless meetings, original members Ray Manzarek and Robby Krieger gravitated towards Astbury because of his “Celtic Buddhist archetype” and baritone vocal timbre. From 2002-20006, his immersion in D21C had a profound affect on Astbury, playing 150 shows. The experience hit him like a lightening rod, reawakening the nearly dormant feelings he had towards his former band. “The Lost Weekend” took a volatile, wild front man and left behind a more focused, grounded artist, one who was ready to take The Cult to a new, elevated level.

“I stood with Ray and Robbie at the grave of Jim Morrison in 2004 on the eve of Jim's 60th birthday and one of the most unforgettable nights of my life performing at Le Zenith in Paris,” he remembers. “As I was about to turn away to give them a moment of privacy, Ray grabbed me by the arm and said, ‘No you belong here with us.’ Something stayed with me; a desire to push beyond my broken language and crippled expression, a desire to learn a new language, a new methodology.”

In 2006, The Cult entered the studio to work on their eight studio album Born Into This and made their first live appearance in nearly four years on the Late, Late Show with Craig Ferguson. The line-up consisted of drummer John Tempesta, guitarist Dimkich, bassist Wyse and, of course, Astbury and Duffy at the helm. Reinvigorated and reinspired, The Cult moved forward with a 2007 release of Born Into This and followed up with 2012’s Choice of Weapon, with the promise of a trilogy.

Somewhere along the way, Astbury was forced to undergo hip surgery after years of physical debauchery. He quickly sunk into the depths of despair and had the arduous task of pulling himself out of the pits of hell.

"I had to rebuild myself after the hip surgery lying in a hospital bed on the Upper East Side,” he recalls. “I was loaded on laudanum and nursing a tragedy of romantic proportions.”

A self-described “hellion,” his injury was acquired from various misadventures, including motorcycle wrecks, PA stacks mishaps, being run over twice as a kid, brawls, falling off hotel balconies, and normal wear and tear. Thankfully, he made a full recovery, which afforded him the prodigious opportunities to come.

In 2014, The Cult was invited to play the Coachella Valley Arts and Music Festival at California’s Inland Empire. Rolling Stone heralded the group’s performance as the “messianic moment” of the event, lending the crowd a sense of Astbury’s newfound spiritual calling. At this time, the group had begun work on the third album in the series, Hidden City.

The name stems from the Spanish phrase: La Ciudad Ocutla, or “hidden city,” which is essentially a slum in Buenos Aires, Argentina. When the FIFA World Cup was held there in 1978, the government wanted to highlight the cosmopolitan and European flair of the more proper sections of the city, while hiding any evidence of the deep social inequalities present in Argentine society. The idea something like this even existed grabbed Astbury by the throat. It ignited the perfect metaphor for his spiritual life and the revolt of the self and soul.

"I find today's gurus are trying to peddle some cure or product or insight like it’s a new phenomena, often charging for what is truly divine and everyone's birthright spiritual knowledge,” he says. “The reward is in sharing insight, helping pull up your fellow as opposed to laud some enlightened perspective like the latest designer handbag. My job is to respond, not influence, but observe, participate and share. There is no higher authority than the heart. All sentient beings should be free of suffering.”